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News

 

Events

 

Oct 2018 right left

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Do you love where you live? Come along to a workshop on Binevenagh and Coastal Lowlands area!

Wednesday 3rd October
Magilligan Field Centre, Seacoast Road, Limavady
Free

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Grass Roots AGM 2018

Saturday 6th October
Newtownbreda Presbyterian Church Hall, Ormeau Road, Belfast
Free

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Harvest Month

Saturday 13th October
Springhill, Moneymore
Adult £5.90, Child £2.95

Autumn tales at Oakfield Glen, Carrickfergus

Saturday 13th October
Oakfield Glen, Carrickfergus
£5 per child; £1 per accompanying adult

Clearance of Pine & Rhododendron

Sunday 14th October
Ballynahone Bog Nature Reserve, near Maghera, Co Londonderry
Free

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Overhead and Underfoot – The Second World War Legacies around the Lough

Tuesday 16th October
The Old Courthouse, Market Square, Antrim
Free

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City2Sea: Pathways for Litter Conference

Monday 22nd October
The Guildhall, Guildhall Street, Derry~Londonderry BT48 6DQ
See registration form above for details

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A Warning for Wildlife 22 August 2018

The Woodland Trust’s Nature’s Calendar project is already receiving records of ripe berries, hastened by the recent heatwave. But the dry weather could spell danger for this year’s wild fruit crops, and the animals that feed on them (via Woodland Trust)

So far the Trust has received 59 records of blackberries ripening, and six records of rowan berries ripening.  The baseline average for these events is 27 August and 1 September respectively, meaning the earliest sightings this year have come in around two months earlier than usual. 

While the official berry records added to Nature’s Calendar are mainly from England and Wales, a glance would suggest that the Northern Ireland countryside isn’t far behind.  The charity, however, needs local people to add their observations to this online project, in order to get a clearer picture of seasonal changes right across the UK.

These early changes in summer scenery could have consequences. If the dry, warm weather continues, the lack of water could mean that berries may be smaller or drop from trees and shrubs.  Migratory birds like fieldfare and redwing (arriving around October) could be left with less food if the resident wildlife has taken their share first. Furthermore, trees may tint earlier as they try to preserve water and can also be more susceptible to threats such as tree pests and diseases. 

Dr Kate Lewthwaite, citizen science manager for the Woodland Trust, said: “It may be the height of summer, but because of the recent weather, we’re already anticipating signs of autumn. Although we’ve only had a small number of berry records so far, the heat will only encourage more fruit to ripen, and leaves on trees may also start to change colour.

“Given the implications this may have for the berry crop and other species in general, we would urge the public to report the first seasonal events they see to Nature’s Calendar.

“Citizen science is vital in informing our view of changing seasons. This year spring suddenly burst forth in April after being subdued by snow in March.  Now, it will be interesting to see how other seasonal timings and species are affected for the rest of 2018.

Read the full press release here…

 

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